Project Benefits

Meeting Future Wastewater Needs

The population in the area that will be served by the new Stowe Regional Water Recovery Facility is projected to increase by 136% between 2014 and 2034. That means that more than 100,000 new residents will move into Stowe Regional WRRF service area between 2014 and 2034.

To accommodate the future wastewater needs of this growing service area, the new Stowe Regional Water Recovery Facility will initially have the treatment capacity to process 15 million gallons of wastewater per day, with future expansions to 25 million gallons per day.

Consolidating Wastewater Facilities

This project will streamline regional wastewater treatment services by replacing two older municipal wastewater treatment plants, the Belmont Wastewater Treatment Plant and the Mount Holly Wastewater Treatment Plant, with a new modern, highly-efficient water resource recovery facility. The new Stowe Regional Water Resource Recovery Facility will have the required treatment capacity to accommodate the future wastewater needs of our growing region at one state-of-the-art wastewater management facility.

Having a single discharge for treated water will help to minimize any shoreline and wetland impacts. Additionally, this new facility will utilize advanced technologies to enhanced environmental practices and allow the facility to more effectively process wastewater and recycle treated water that meets heightened water quality and nutrient removal standards.

If the existing municipal wastewater treatment plants were to remain in use, each would need extensive and cost-prohibitive upgrades to meet the expanding needs of their respective community. If Charlotte Water continued to pump wastewater flows from communities in northwestern Mecklenburg County to Pineville for wastewater treatment at the McAlpine Creek Wastewater Management Facility, it would require the utility to replace a significant portion of the underground pipes that provide collection system linkage between these two points.

Wastewater Facility Locations

Minimizing Wastewater Pumping

This project will help minimize excessive wastewater collection system pumping by reducing the distance that wastewater has to be pumped to reach a wastewater treatment facility. Currently, wastewater flows from the Long Creek Basin in northwestern Mecklenburg County are being pumped from the Long Creek Pump Station to the Paw Creek Pump Station, and then treated at the McAlpine Creek Wastewater Management Facility in Pineville, which is about a 27 mile pumping route. Additionally, wastewater flows from the Paw Creek Basin in northwestern Mecklenburg County are being pumped from the Paw Creek Pump Station and treated at the McAlpine Creek Wastewater Management Facility, which is about a 17 mile pumping route.

By building the new Stowe Regional Water Resource Recovery Facility there will be a wastewater treatment plant located in close proximity to these service areas that can provide wastewater treatment services for communities in northwestern Mecklenburg County and east Gaston County. Reducing the distance that wastewater must be pumped to reach a wastewater treatment plant, it not only saves energy but also reduces the possibility of a wastewater spill occurring.

If the new Stowe Regional Water Resource Recovery Facility is not constructed and Charlotte Water continues to pump wastewater flows from northwestern Mecklenburg County to the McAlpine Creek Wastewater Management Facility in Pineville, the underground pipes that provide collection system linkage between these services areas and McAlpine Creek Wastewater Management Facility will soon need to be excavated and replaced. A collection system replacement project of this magnitude will be very costly for the utility and cause significant construction impacts.

Pumping System Location

Enhanced Environmental Practices

The new Stowe Regional Water Resource Recovery Facility will use the latest technologies to implement enhanced environmental practices and sustainability standards. This new water resource recovery facility will process and clean wastewater more effectively, ensuring that the treated water that we recycle into the Catawba River meets heightened water quality standards and nutrient removal goals.

This new facility will comply with the Lake Wylie Total Maximum Daily Load nutrient management regulations that carefully limit the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus that can be discharged into the Catawba River and Lake Wylie.

The facility will also align with the City of Charlotte’s sustainability goals outlined in the Strategic Energy Action Plan (SEAP) and City Council’s Resolution for a Sustainable and Resilient Charlotte by 2050. To learn more about the City of Charlotte’s commitment to environmental stewardship, please visit www.charlottenc.gov/sustainability.

Investing In Our Community

We are committed to a implementing a Community Project on the land around the new Stowe Regional Water Resource Recovery Facility that would serve as an enriching community amenity for neighbors. We want this Community Project to create a vibrant public space or a meaningful community feature that encourages connectedness, cohesion, and well-being in our project community.

We plan to host stakeholder visioning workshops and assemble a community stakeholder committee to help us better understand community members’ goals and aspirations for this Community Project. With your participation, we will strive to create an enriching Community Project that will increase vibrancy, encourage connectedness, and promote well-being in our Stowe Regional project community.

To stay informed about public involvement opportunities related to the Community Project, please sign up for our project updates.